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Teen Pregnancy Prevention in  California after State Budget Cuts | Full Report
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Teen Pregnancy

Teen Pregnancy Prevention in California after State Budget Cuts | Full Report

This research brief the impact of cuts in California’s State Budget on teen pregnancy prevention programs.

California built a successful infrastructure of programs aimed at preventing teen pregnancy through various funding initiatives. Since 2008, the California State Budget for these teen pregnancy prevention initiatives has been reduced by 72%. Researchers at the Bixby Center and Philip R. Lee Institute for Health Policy Studies conducted a study describing the impact of budget cutbacks on teen pregnancy prevention programs and services. A research brief and companion fact sheet about the curtailment of programs and the reduction in participants served may inform education efforts to reinstate funds for teen pregnancy prevention.

This article was taken from Jan Malvin, Jennifer Yarger, and Claire Brindis. Teen Pregnancy Prevention in California after State Budget Cuts. Bixby Center for Global Reproductive Health, Philip R.Lee Institute for Health Policy Studies, University of California, San Francisco. February 2013.

 


Teen Pregnancy Prevention in California after State Budget Cuts | Summary

This fact sheet summarizes the impact of cuts in California’s State Budget on teen pregnancy prevention programs.

This article was taken from Jan Malvin, Jennifer Yarger, and Claire Brindis. Teen Pregnancy Prevention in California after State Budget Cuts: Summary. Bixby Center for Global Reproductive Health, Philip R. Lee Institute for Health Policy Studies, University of California, San Francisco. February 2013.

 


State Facts on Unintended Pregnancy by Guttmacher Institute

State Facts About Unintended Pregnancy

This tool by the Guttmacher Institute provides a comprehensive overview and includes incidence, outcomes and public costs for each state.  It also documents the impact of publicly funded services in averting unintended pregnancy.

About half of the 6.7 million pregnancies in the United States each year are unintended. For women and families, births resulting from unintended pregnancies have been linked to adverse maternal and child health outcomes and myriad social and economic challenges. Births stemming from unintended pregnancy are also costly to the federal and state governments, resulting in $11 billion in government expenditures in 2006.

To provide a one-stop resource and comprehensive overview, the Guttmacher Institute is launching a new tool that offers more than two dozen state-specific indicators related to unintended pregnancy, including:

  • The incidence and outcomes of unintended pregnancy in each state, including the proportion of all pregnancies that are unintended; the rates of unintended pregnancy; the proportions of unintended pregnancies that result in births and abortions; and the proportion of all births resulting from unintended pregnancy;
  • The public cost of unintended pregnancy in each state, including the proportion of births resulting from unintended pregnancy that were publicly funded; the cost of births resulting from unintended pregnancies to the federal and state governments; and the total public cost for births resulting from unintended pregnancies per woman aged 15–44;
  • The impact in each state of publicly funded family planning services, including the number of contraceptive clients served by publicly supported family planning centers; public expenditures for family planning services from Medicaid, Title X and other sources; the number of unintended pregnancies, births and abortions averted by these services; and the resulting savings to the federal and state governments.

This article was taken from © 2012 Guttmacher Institute

 


What Works for Pregnant and Parenting Teens – Expert Panel Workgroup

The Office of Adolescent Health publishes “Promising Strategies and Existing Gaps in Supporting Pregnant and Parenting Teens: Summary of Expert Panel Workgroup Meetings during January and July 2012 in Washington, D.C.” These workgroups were convened by the Office of Adolescent Health (OAH) to identify strategies and gaps in the field of support for pregnant and parenting teens.

The report includes promising practices in reaching, engaging, and retaining pregnant and parenting teens; effective program components when working with pregnant and parenting teens; and concrete examples for implementing those core components. As such, it is an important resource for practitioners and stakeholders serving or supporting pregnant and parenting teens. The report can be found here: http://www.hhs.gov/ash/oah/resources-and-publications/info/Assets/paf_expert_panel_rpt_2012.pdf.

This article was taken from © 2012 Office of Adolescent Health

 


Education for Pregnant and Parenting Minors in California

The National Partnership for Women & Families, National Health Law Program (NHeLP) and Planned Parenthood of Pasadena and San Gabriel Valley, Inc. have released a free quick-reference guide for educators, health and social care providers who work with California youth who are pregnant or parenting. It is a companion to a new website written and designed to inform pregnant and parenting youth in California of their legal rights. Education for Pregnant and Parenting Minors in California is one of three professional guides released today; the others are for health care and social service workers in California. Please Email TRG@pppsgv.org  for information for a free face-to-face training on the California Pregnant and Parenting Youth Guide or go to the webpage www.pregnantyouth.info and look for dates and times for free online trainings under the professional resources tab.

This article was taken from © 2011 National Partnership for Women & Families

 


A Pregnancy Test for Schools: The Impact of Education Laws on Pregnant and Parenting Students

This report describes the particular challenges faced by pregnant and parenting students, highlights the requirements of federal laws, reviews relevant state laws and policies, and concludes with recommendations for both policymakers and for schools. It also includes a toolkit with resources for advocates and service providers who work with pregnant and parenting youth.

This article was taken from National Women's Law Center

 


Examining State-Level Patterns in Teen Childbearing: 1991-2009

Child Trends’ latest brief uses state-level data to examine declines in the teen birth rate over 19 years.  The brief describes variation across states during this time frame, in the degree of decline and in patterns over time.

This article was taken from Child Trends

 


Births: Preliminary Data for 2010

The birth rate for U.S. teenagers 15-19 years dropped 9 percent to 34.3 per 1,000, a record low for the Nation and declined to historic lows for younger and older teenagers and for all race and Hispanic origin groups.

This article was taken from Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Health Statistics

 


Expecting Success: How Policymakers and Educators Can Help Teen Parents Stay in School

The Massachusetts Alliance on Teen Pregnancy released The Promise Project Report from findings and policy recommendations based on data collected from teen parents, teen parent service providers, and educators. The research presented in the report reveals that many teens who were headed toward dropping out become re-committed to school once they become parents. The research also demonstrates that too often these youth do not reach their graduation goals, because they need family, schools, and teen parent programs that both support them and set high expectations for their success.

This article was taken from The Massachusetts Alliance on Teen Pregnancy

 


Latina adolescents’ perceptions of their male partners’ influences on childbearing: findings from a qualitative study in California

This study explored the role that male partners play in the occurrence of pregnancy and their influence on first-time mothers’ future plans. Qualitative analysis revealed that partners played a significant role in the use of contraception, timing and desire for pregnancy and young women’s post-pregnancy plans for education, work and childrearing.

 


 

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